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Pupil Premium

St Peter’s CE Primary & Nursery School

Pupil Premium Expenditure 2018/19

 

Thank you to all who have applied for Pupil Premium funding. This additional money enables us to find ways of benefitting all children, as well as providing extra support for your child.

Pupil Premium is an allocation of funding provided to schools to support children who may be vulnerable to underachievement.

The Pupil Premium Grant provides additional funding for children who have been eligible for free school meals in any of the previous six years, as well as looked after and adopted children. It also provides a smaller amount of funding for children who have been eligible for the service child premium at any point in the last five years. Children who are eligible for the PPG are considered to be ‘disadvantaged children’, hence they deserve additional support.

All schools are required to report on the amount of funding and how it is being used.

The Governing Body of St Peter’s have decided that this grant will be most effectively spent on supporting children’s learning in the classroom by providing high quality first teaching, curriculum support, targeted intervention, engagement and enrichment activities, pastoral support and social and behavioural intervention.

As with all children at St Peter’s, to ensure maximum impact the needs of children entitled to the Pupil Premium are clearly identified, steps are taken to meet their individual needs and their progress is closely monitored through school. Where small group / 1:1 support is felt to be most beneficial, Pupil Premium funding will be used to support this provision.

 

Barriers

Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

A. 

Low attainment on entry

B.

Poor oral language and communication skills linked to limited vocabulary

C. 

Poor behaviour for learning e.g. ability to follow instructions, concentration

D. 

Low self-esteem, confidence and resilience

E. 

Limited life experiences so far

F. 

EAL -

G. 

SENd

H.

Difficulties in establishing relationships with peers

I. 

Attachment and trauma issues

J. 

Long term illness, e.g. diabetes

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

   K.

Challenging circumstances at home, e.g. parental separation, bereavement 

   L.

Low attendance and punctuality rates

   M.

Poor parental engagement

   N.

Poor speech and language skills needing intervention form external agencies

   O.

Poor Personal, Social and Emotional Development linked to lack of self-care – referral to school nurse

   P.

EAL – multi-cultural agency support needed for children and their families

Desired outcomes

 

Desired outcomes

Success criteria

A. 

Pupils will make accelerated progress to come into line with the attainment of peers.

Learning looks and assessment data show accelerated progress and raised attainment.

B. 

Improved language and communication skills and vocabulary.

Children are able to verbalise ideas and make themselves understood. Through reading groups, vocabulary is explored and used correctly.

C. 

Children will demonstrate effective behaviour for learning.

Staff consistently follow the behaviour policy across school.

Children behave as expected during lessons and around school.

Children and their peers are able to learn in a calm and focused environment.

D. 

Through use of LM time, PSHE lessons and problem based learning children will develop healthier mindsets.

Positive relationships between adults and children.

Children are willing to take risks with their learning.

Children are positive about themselves and feel safe and valued.

E. 

Children have opportunities to see and hear people and places that they might not in their everyday lives, e.g. organising theatre trips, visiting authors, gardening, hatching chicks, residential activities, religious leaders from other faiths...

Children have participated in Magic Moments for each year group.

PP children given priority in extracurricular activities which is also funded.

Exciting and broad curriculum provided.

F. 

EAL children will be able to communicate with adults and peers so that they can feel part of our school and wider community.

Paired and group work to support language acquisition and practise.

Children are able to communicate and be understood.

Children are able to participate in all aspects of school life.

Translators provided where necessary.

Letters translated so that all parents can access them.

G. 

SENd children will achieve to the best of their abilities through appropriate support and intervention.

SENd children are included in class activities through appropriate resources and support.

Assessment trackers show that SENd children are making at least expected progress.

H. 

Children are able to establish and maintain healthy relationships with their peers through support from adults, LM and a robust PSHE curriculum.

Playground Pals are effective in supporting and helping others at playtime.

Children are happy and have friends.

Children are able to use conflict resolution strategies where appropriate. Children access LM support when necessary.

I. 

Children with attachment issues feel secure and confident in school.

They feel safe and valued.

Adults who interact with them do so through an attachment lens in terms of behaviour and response.

Staff have received attachment and trauma training and are able to support pupils effectively. 

J. 

Children’s medical conditions will have limited impact upon their learning within school.

Staff have received training with the school nurse regarding the support of pupils with diabetes within school.

K. 

Children feel safe at school and that they can talk to a safe adult if necessary.

LM support deployed effectively to help most vulnerable children process difficult emotions and events.

 L.

Rates of attendance and punctuality improve.

Discussion with parents and child as to why attendance or punctuality is low and how we can support them to improve it.

Robust monitoring of attendance by school and involvement of EWO where necessary.

 

M. 

Parents are welcomed into school and have a variety of ways of engaging with staff, e.g. class assemblies, meet the teacher, school website, parents’ evenings, Summer Fete...

Parental uptake for course such as ‘Understanding your Child’ is good.

Parental surveys reflect a positive attitude to school and communication with us.

Parents attend school events.

N. 

Those children whose speech and language needs cannot be met within the school setting, are identified and referred to outside agencies promptly.

Children are identified and given expert help to improve language skills.

O. 

For those children and families who are finding basic self-care skills difficult, school will signpost families to further help, e.g. School, Nurse Service.

Families are effectively signposted to the appropriate outside agency for help and advice.

P. 

Where children arrive in school speaking no English, school is prompt in obtaining support from outside agencies, such as the Multicultural Agency to address the initial barriers in communication.

Families and children needing additional help are identified quickly and feel supported.

Basic language skills improve.

Translators provided for parent meetings.

 

Principles

Teaching and learning at St Peter’s is designed to meet the individual needs of all children.

  • We ensure that appropriate provision is made for any child who belongs to a vulnerable group or is socially disadvantaged, and that their needs are adequately assessed and met. We find ways to allocate Pupil Premium funding that helps to meet the need of all priority groups and individuals whilst still primarily targeting eligible children.

  • We recognise that not all children who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged and we also recognise that not all children that are disadvantaged have free school meals.

  • We distribute Pupil Premium funding after a needs analysis to identify priority groups and individuals.

    St Peter’s Pupil Premium Grant for 2018-19 is £112,120

    Our Pupil Premium grant for 2018/19 is based on 102 children meeting the eligibility criteria.

    Funding is allocated individually, but provision varies according to age, individual needs and interests. The following is a list of how the Pupil Premium grant has been allocated this year.

    Foundation Stage:

  • High quality professional development for Teachers and Teaching Assistants to ensure children are taught using the most effective teaching methods;

  • Additional Teaching Assistant support in the classroom;

  • Additional individual or small group intervention activities, e.g. daily nurture group and 2h per week intervention group focusing on Prime Areas of Learning and Development / Nursery Communication Group;

  • Daily vocabulary intervention sessions;

  • Fortnightly Forest School sessions;

  • Regular 1:1 meetings with a Learning Mentor to support children’s personal development and well-being;

  • EAL small group support.

    Key Stage 1

  • High quality professional development for Teachers and Teaching Assistants to ensure children are taught using the most effective teaching methods;

  • Through curriculum design, biasing the learning to ensure disadvantaged children have opportunities for extra consolidation and engaging, relevant learning sequences relevant to their interests;

  • Additional Teaching Assistant support in lessons;

  • Individual or small group intervention activities, e.g. IDL Numeracy & Literacy;

  • Daily vocabulary intervention sessions;

  • Intervention groups, outside of lesson times, for reading, phonics, writing and/or maths as appropriate;

  • Specialist support;

  • EAL small group support;

  • Regular Learning Mentor sessions focused on supporting pupils’ personal development, social skills and well-being;

  • Funding educational visits and extra-curricular clubs;

  • Extra resources to support and extend phonics, reading and maths skills;

  • Providing equipment and clothing to enable children to participate fully in school activities, e.g. plays and sport.

    Key Stage 2

  • High quality professional development for Teachers and Teaching Assistants to ensure children are taught using the most effective teaching methods;

  • Through curriculum design, biasing the learning to ensure disadvantaged children have opportunities for extra consolidation and engaging, relevant learning sequences relevant to their interests;

  • Additional Teaching Assistant support in lessons;

  • Daily vocabulary intervention sessions;

  • Individual or small group intervention programmes focused on reading, e.g. IDL and daily reading support;

  • Intervention programmes focused on phonics, writing and maths, such as IDL, precision teaching and pre-tutoring maths sessions;

  • Weekly 30 minute mentoring session with a class teacher;

  • Intervention groups in reading, writing and maths for children not working at the expected level;

  • EAL small group support;

  • Extra-curricular coaching to support children who have fallen behind, e.g. one hour per week of small group targeted maths teaching (after school);

  • 1:1 / small group Learning Mentor support for children to enable them to make better progress in both academic and personal outcomes;

  • Specialist support where needed;

  • Raising pupil aspirations through engagement/aspiration programmes such as funded educational visits/extra-curricular activities and subsidised musical instrument tuition (as appropriate);

  • Extra resources to support and extend phonics, reading and math skills;

  • Supporting school transitions, e.g. from Y6 to Y7.

    NB: Only children currently eligible for free school meals have clothing, equipment, extra-curricular clubs and school trips funded by St Peter’s. This is in recognition of the financial constraints families who are eligible for free school meals may face.


Pupil Premium Grant Allocation 2018/19

 

Focus for Spending

Costs

Teaching Assistants

£93,060

Parent Liaison

£1,000

Professional Development

£2,000

Resources

£11,560

Specialist Support

£2,000

Curriculum Enrichment

£2,500

 

 

Pupil Premium Grant Allocation & Impact 2017-18 (£121,900)

OOur Pupil Premium grant for 2017/18 was based on 112 children meeting the eligibility criteria.

Focus for Spending

Costs

Teaching Assistants

£93,060

Parent Liaison

£1,000

Professional Development

£1,000

Resources

£23,340

Specialist Support

£1,000

Curriculum Enrichment

£2,500

 

The results for disadvantaged children are compared against those for non-disadvantaged children nationally; they are not compared against the results for disadvantaged children nationally. This comparison can be misleading since the results for non-disadvantaged children nationally are higher than those for all children nationally.

A key measure of a school’s effectiveness in relation to disadvantaged children is the Progress Gap (the difference between the progress of disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged children in each subject each year). Our challenge is to eliminate this gap by providing effective intervention and support via the Pupil Premium Grant.

 

Progress scores (which are a measure of children’s progress from Y2 to Y6): Disadvantaged Children

15 Children

St Peter’s Average for Disadvantaged Children

St Peter’s Average for Non-disadvantaged Children

LA Average for

Non-disadvantaged Children

National Average for Non-disadvantaged Children

Reading

-0.25

+1.08

+0.17

+0.31

Writing

+1.28

+0.43

-0.45

+0.24

Maths

+1.68

+3.37

-0.41

+0.31

The progress of disadvantaged children was in line with the national average for all children.

 

The overall progress made by disadvantaged children in Reading and Maths was below the overall progress measure for this cohort. However, the progress of the disadvantaged children in Writing was greater than the overall progress measure for this cohort (+1.28 compared to +0.63).

Year

Number

of

Children

D / Non-D

Reading

Writing

Maths

Progress Score for Disad Children

Progress Score for Non Disad Children

Gap

Progress Score for Disad Children

Progress Score for Non Disad Children

       Gap

Progress Score for Disad Children

Progress Score for Non Disad Children

        Gap

2018

15 / 47

-0.25

1.1

 -1.35

+1.28

+0.4

   +0.88

+1.68

+3.4

-1.72

2018 Progress Gap

 

Average Progress for Disadvantaged Children in Reading, Writing and Maths 2018

Progress Score for Disadvantaged Children

Number of Children

Reading

Writing

Maths

(national average for non-disadvantaged children)

2018

15

-0.25

+1.28

+1.68

In all three subjects disadvantaged children made more progress than they did in 2017; this was particularly noticeable in Reading. Their progress in Maths also increased when compared to 2017.

 

Attainment: Disadvantaged Children v Non-Disadvantaged Children Nationally

15 children

% of disadvantaged children at the expected level at St Peter’s

% of non-disadvantaged children at the expected level

Nationally

% of disadvantaged children at the higher level at St Peter’s

% of non-disadvantaged children at the higher level

Nationally

Reading

60%

80%

27%

33%

Writing

67%

83%

20%

24%

GPS

60%

82%

27%

39%

Maths

60%

81%

20%

28%

Reading, Writing & Maths

47%

70%

13%

12%

While the progress of disadvantaged children is in line with that of all children nationally, their attainment was below the attainment of both non-disadvantaged children and all children nationally and also when compared to others in their cohort. Our challenge is therefore not just to match expected progress, but exceed it. This is a considerable challenge.

 


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